Blog Posts

I have been a member of the EITI Executive Committee from its creation in 2007 until today. Over the last ten years I have participated regularly in our multi-stakeholder dialogue and have witnessed DRC EITI grow from strength to strength as it has dealt with and overcome a number of tough circumstances. The collective awareness of issues facing the extractive sector in the DRC has risen amongst stakeholders and produced results that all parties can live with,

How stakeholders from government, civil society and industry worked together to make contract disclosure a reality.

Last month, Ghana launched its new petroleum register, which discloses a wealth of information on the companies extracting the country’s oil and the terms of their agreements with the Government of Ghana. This includes the actual contracts, outlining the legal and fiscal terms and conditions for the companies’ activities.

Seven suggestions to support women’s leadership in the extractive sectors.

Have you ever noticed that you are the only female sitting at the table?

In some countries, this is quite glaring, especially when having a conversation about the governance of the oil, gas and mining sectors. These sectors can have significant social, economic and environmental impacts on affected communities. They can change the natural environment, employment opportunities, the cost of living and social dynamics.

Transparency International (TI) has released its annual Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) for 2017. The Index is of great interest to extractive sector followers and the EITI.

Unfortunately, the global picture is pretty dismal. This year’s Corruption Perceptions Index highlights that the majority of countries are making little or no progress in ending corruption. Sadly this seems particularly true of countries with a significant extractives sector. Amongst the largest oil-producers in the world,

At the Mining Indaba last week, new versions of the Online Repository portals were presented by the Governments of Ghana, Mali, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The Online Repository portals publish the entire mining license registry, owner details and payments data directly from the mining cadastre system.

The new Online Repository portal design is refining a standard set and developed by Sierra Leone, who launched the first Online Repository in 2012.

The board of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative is meeting in Oslo this week to discuss, among other issues, the mainstreaming of extractive sector reporting. As focus moves away from EITI reports to governments’ own systems, it is important to examine the initiative’s relationship with key domestic actors like supreme audit institutions.

Day 2 of EITI Board meeting - Outcomes of Validation

Timor-Leste today joined Mongolia and the Philippines as the first countries having made satisfactory progress against the Standard. The Board also found Albania, Burkina Faso, and Kazakhstan to have made meaningful progress against the EITI Standard.

Two more Asian success stories

Mainstreaming is the future of EITI

The EITI Board made a groundbreaking decision today that will change how EITI implementation will look like in the coming years.

From EITI reports to systematic disclosures

The Board agreed to make systematic disclosures of extractives data through government and company systems the default expectation from countries. This means that instead of producing annual EITI Reports that typically cover fiscal periods that are behind by two years,

Nikolai Astrup, the new Norwegian Minister for Development, was speaking at a reception to mark the 39th EITI Board meeting. He started by quoting part of a powerful speech delivered at Davos by Erna Solberg, Norway’s prime minister: 

“Corruption and illegal financial flows are linked to the whole range of security threats we face today: climate change, terror, organised crime, cybercrime, to mention a few. We face multiple challenges, not limited by national borders.

Photo: Head of Papua New Guinea EITI Mr Lucas Alkan (right) being presented a gift by the leader of a civil society organisation in East Sepik Province after completion of an EITI Awareness Roadshow in the capital, Wewak in November last year.

Before Papua New Guinea signed up to implement the EITI Standard in 2013, there was no framework in place for disclosure of revenue streams from the country’s mining and petroleum sector.

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