Blog Posts

Rebecca Iwerks is the Director of Capacity Development at the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) and works to develop curriculum to help actors translate research into effective policy change.

The changes to the EITI Standard approved by the EITI Board in Kyiv last week represent a significant step towards making natural resource governance more gender-inclusive. The EITI’s 52 member states are now required to consider gender participation in their multi-stakeholder group,

It is no secret that the extractive industries are a male-dominated sector. Evidence suggests that while the benefits of extractive industry projects are enjoyed primarily by men, it is women who bear a disproportionate share of the negative social, economic and environmental impacts. Last week, the EITI Board agreed to revise the EITI Standard to include provisions which will make the EITI more gender-responsive. 

Louise Russell-Prywata is the program manager of the OpenOwnership pilot program, which supports data publishers in national governments and multinational institutions to publish high quality, highly usable beneficial owernship data. 

The Kyrgyz Republic is one of over 50 countries who have committed, through the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) Standard, to publishing the beneficial owners of extractives license holders by 1 January 2020.

It is no secret that civic space is shrinking worldwide, including in some of the EITI’s 52 member states. Guaranteeing civil society’s free and active engagement in extractives governance is a fundamental part of the EITI process. Civil society is one of the three constituencies that sit on the EITI Board and national multi-stakeholder groups. They play a crucial role in scrutinising data, pushing for reform and holding governments and companies to account.

The EITI was created to fix a failure of governance in the oil, gas and mining sector and is guided by the belief that a country’s natural resources belong to its citizens. The organisation was born out of a dynamic coalition of committed activists, progressive companies and brave governments who convened to seek consensus on how the sector could be better managed. At the time of its inception,

Indonesia, the world’s fourth most populous country, abounds in natural resources. In 2016, its oil, gas and mining activities contributed 7% of total government revenues. Access to the internet is becoming more widespread across the 17,000 island archipelago nation, providing a cost-efficient way to make extractives data accessible to communities near oil, gas and mining projects. Sub-national transfers of extractive revenues amounted to USD 1.6 billion in 2016,

Government takes bold step of requesting financial models from companies

Zambia, Africa’s second-largest producer of copper, is highly dependent on mining as its major productive industry. Mining contributes to 68% of the country’s foreign exchange earnings and 73% of total export value, according to the latest EITI reporting. Zambia has made radical changes to its mining taxation policies over the past decades, giving rise to much debate and discussion in the sector.

The good governance of natural resources has undergone an openness revolution since the EITI was established over a decade ago. The information being disclosed along the extractive industry value chain is becoming increasingly timely, accurate and granular, yet challenges remain in the form of shrinking civic space, corruption and under-used data.

2018 was an eventful year for the EITI. Over USD 150 billion in extractives revenues was disclosed by the EITI countries in total, and over half of EITI’s 51 implementing countries were assessed against the Standard, of which Colombia, Mongolia, Senegal and Timor-Leste reached the highest level of progress. Efforts to tackle hidden ownership, corruption and mismanagement in the extractives advanced, as EITI countries raced ahead, with new laws, regulations and registers in Ghana, Kyrgyz Republic,

Renewable energy policy has more to learn from extractives sector governance than you might think. Here are four lessons the extractives sector can share to improve the chances of a successful energy transition – the switch from a fossil-based energy system to a more sustainable infrastructure, fuelled by clean energy sources

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