Open data and EITI

The EITI Global Conference in Lima hosted several side-events, with the EITI Data Storytellers Bootcamp being a notable one. This event was aimed at sharing experiences and cooperation on the ways to use the growing volume of data produced by the EITI reports.

Workstreams of the Bootcamp covered different open data tools, software and portals to visualize, interpret and present information, including some useful hacks as user-centered design,

Open Data needed to improve extractive industries governance

Dewi from Indonesia EITI blogs from the Data Storytelling Bootcamp.

Dewi Yuliandini H is a Data Analyst of Extractives at Publish What You Pay Indonesia, and is works on Open Data, Natural Resources Management and Climate Change issues. Follow Dewi on Twitter @dewiyuliandini

“While others are busy discussing about governance and management, we are here having fun playing with data and lots of games such as MAP-X, OpenRefine, Tableau,

How to open beneficial ownership data and apply standards for disclosure formats?

At the EITI Opening Up Ownership Conference, I facilitated a session on standards for beneficial ownership data in the context of the open data and open government movements. I was joined by Antya Widita, the Web Foundation's Data Lab Manager in Jakarta and Malick Tapsoba, Head of the Burkina Faso Open Data Initiative. Alongside these two open data experts, we were lucky to be joined by Yanuar Nugroho, the Deputy Chief of Staff, Office of the President,

Mauritania ‘appening’ up extractives data

21/11/2017 – EITI-Mauritania is today launching an app aimed at providing easy access to key and simplified data on Mauritania’s mining and petroleum sectors drawing from EITI reports since 2012.

This app, available in French and soon in Arabic, was developed by students from the University of Nouakchott, with support from the EITI-Mauritania national secretariat and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)

Make things open, it makes things better

Making information public always bears the risk that people discover mistakes. But that’s what will make it better, too. It’s what happened when we started publishing open EITI data on a large scale.

I wish I came up with the slogan used in the title of this blog. But the credit goes to the Government Digital Service (GDS) team in the UK. It’s one of their design principles. I learned more about it when I visited them in March this year,

Financial modelling – the next step in EITI reconciliations?

Knowing how to model a project’s revenue can strengthen the capacity of the government.

When the EITI set out its work ten years ago, the core idea was to reconcile and compare the payments made by companies and governments made to each other to see if they added up to the same amount. This can and has uncovered problems such as corruption. In 2013 the Standard was expanded to cover the whole value chain including the legal, fiscal,

Survey on open data in EITI implementing countries

This blog is based on a survey undertaken by the EITI International Secretariat in January 2017. The results were presented to the EITI Board at its recent meeting in Bogota. The survey explores the status of EITI countries’ efforts in agreeing open data policies and providing EITI data in open formats. The survey will be repeated in 2018 to assess progress in addressing these issues.

Open data policy webinar: Creating an open data policy

This training is for National Coordinators in EITI implementing countries.

Part 1: How to develop an open data policy

What does the EITI Standard require, possible policy options and steps of creating an open data policy.Duration: 30 minutes

Part 2: Examples from implementing countries

Different approaches to open data and examples of open data policiesDuration: 15 minutes

Part 3: Q&A and next steps 

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